Friday, April 25, 2014

R. Baker & Son Rigging Project

R. Baker & Son recently performed a rigging project to install two large lyophilizers on the second floor of a large pharmaceutical plant. Because some pieces were as large as 60,000 lbs., the floor had to be reinforced along the route in which the loads were to be rigged before work could begin.  A structural engineer helped R. Baker & Son design the support system to shore up existing steel members and approved the final drawings, and the floor reinforcements were constructed. 

The lyophilizer pieces were transported by truck to the project site, and a crane was maneuvered into the tight access area where a platform had been constructed at the building opening.  One by one, the Baker crew rigged lyophilizer chambers, refrigeration skids, and condensing skids from the trailer to the platform and rolled the live loads on skates into the building.  Riggers carefully transported the live loads along the 100-ft. route marked on protective heavy-duty masonite sheeting.  

Precise placement of the lyophilizers was imperative to ensure that adjacent equipment could be connected properly, so laser-aligned holes were pre-drilled in the floor. 
R. Baker & Son carefully rigged, set, assembled, and secured each piece of equipment.  The project was successfully completed on-time and on-budget. 

R. Baker & Son All Industrial Services
1 Globe Court
Red Bank, NJ 07701
Phone: 732-222-3553
Fax: 732-450-0311
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Sunday, April 6, 2014

New York City Demolition Waste by David Baker

New York City generates over 14 tons of waste, and construction and demolition (C&D) waste accounts for more than 60%. C&D waste is defined as uncontaminated solid waste.  C&D abatement operations are regulated by the Department of Buildings (DOB), the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), and the Fire Department of New York (FDNY).  Depending on the nature of a demolition project, permits must be issued by one or any combination of the three agencies. 

Though New York City strictly enforces disposition of construction and demolition debris, it encourages but does not require recycling of C&D waste.  R. Baker & Son is wholly committed to reuse and recycling of demolition debris to ease environmental impact, conserve natural resources, and save energy. Demolition waste materials that are currently recycled include asphalt, brick, corrugated cardboard, carpet, concrete, drywall, film plastic, fluorescent lamps, glass, land clearing debris, metal, pallets, roofing, and wood. Renovation, demolition and dismantling projects may also yield salvageable materials that can be reused, such as appliances, architectural features, circuit breakers, office furniture, windows and doors, and wood timbers.  Certain solid waste cannot be categorized as construction and demolition debris.  This can include asbestos, fluorescent lights, carpeting, etc. 

Currently, there are eighty regulated construction and demolition waste processing facilities in New York State, and 280 registered C&D waste processing facilities.
  Registered facilities process wood, concrete, masonry, steel, asphalt, brick, soil, and rock that are uncontaminated. In 2010 these facilities processed 11.5 million tons of construction and demolition debris and recovered about 6.3 million tons of material. 

As part of our commitment to divert construction and demolition debris from landfills and incineration facilities, R. Baker & Son is 100% LEED compliant and ensures that clients receive all LEED rating points (up to 14 points) available in our portion of a project.  Recycling and/or salvage of C&D debris can earn 1-2 LEED points.  Diversion of 50% of demolition waste is worth 1 point, and 75% earns 2 points. Non-LEED projects may also qualify for LEED points if construction and demolition debris is appropriately recycled or salvaged. 

photo courtesy of USGBC